Mother's Day
母の日
ははのひ

Mother's Day has been celebrated in the United States since 1914, but in Japan it was not officially recognized until after the World War in 1947. Many people give their mothers carnations on this day and the flower shops are full of carnations.

According to a survey by Coanet Internet Service,* roughly half (49 %) of all Japanese junior and senior high school students give a gift to their mother on Mother's Day. Types of gifts in order of popularity are: flowers (41 %), jewelry and accessories (8 %), cakes (6 %), handkerchiefs (5 %), and letters (4 %). Boys are most likely to give flowers (66.7 %), followed by cakes (9.5 %), handkerchiefs (9.5 %), and aprons (9.5 %). Girls give flowers (38.1 %), jewelry and accessories (9.5 %), cakes (7.1 %), handkerchiefs (6 %), letters (4.8 %), and towels (3.6 %). Some help with chores around the house in lieu of a gift (3.6 %). Most spent 500 yen or less on their gift (38.9 %), followed by 500 to 1,000 yen (36.7 %), 2,000 to 5,000 yen (18.9 %), and 1,000 to 1,500 yen (16.7 %). As with Father's Day gifts, older students tend to spend more than younger students.



*Coanet Internet Service, Inc., Chu kokosei no "Haha no hi" "Chichi no hi" ni kansuru ishiki chosa, 2001




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